Himeros: The God of Love and Sexual Desire

Himeros: The God of Love and Sexual Desire

The Erotes are a collective of winged gods associated with passion and sexual intercourse in ancient Greek mythology. One of the Erotes is Himeros, the god of reckless love and sexual desire.   Who is Himeros?   In  Greek mythology, Himeros is a primordial god who created

The Erotes are a collective of winged gods associated with passion and sexual intercourse in ancient Greek mythology. One of the Erotes is Himeros, the god of reckless love and sexual desire.  

Who is Himeros?  

In  Greek mythology, Himeros is a primordial god who created lust and desire in people. Himeros is also the son of the goddess Aphrodite and the god Ares. He represents sexual desire and unrequited love, unlike his twin brother Anteros who is the god of reciprocal love. 

Himeros is the Greek god of uncontrollable lust and desire in people. A young man who carries a bow and arrow while wearing a taenia, a colorful headband worn by athletes. He is the son of Aphrodite, and he has a sibling Eros, who is his twin brother. His other siblings are Pothos, Anteros, Hermaphroditus, Hedylogos, Phobos, Deimos, and Harmonia.   

Himeros is a winged youth or child. He often appears alongside Eros in scenes of Aphrodite's birth, fluttering around the goddess as she reclines in her conch-shell bed. At other times, he appears as a triad of love gods with Eros and Pothos (Love and Passion).  

Myths  

In one myth about Himeros, he and his twin brother Eros were present when Aphrodite emerged from the sea foam. But in other tales, Aphrodite is pregnant with the twins when she was born, or impregnated by the god of war, Ares.   

Classic literature quotes involving Himeros  

Sappho, Fragment 194 (from Himerius, Orations) (trans. Campbell, Vol. Greek Lyric I) (Greek lyric C6th B.C.) :  

"[The rites of Aphrodite]: After the contests [mock contests of suitors] she goes into the bridal chamber, garlands the room and makes up the bed, then she gathers the girls into the bridal room and brings Aphrodite herself on the Kharites' (Charites', Graces') chariot with her chorus of Erotes (Loves) to join in the fun. She binds Aphrodite's hair in hyacinth. she adorns the Erotes' wings and tresses with gold and urges them on in procession before the chariot, waving their torches in the air."  

The Anacreontea, Fragment 25 :  

"Eros (Love) is always weaving his nest in my heart: one Pothos (Desire) is getting his wings, another is still an egg, another is half-hatched already, and there is a continuous shouting from the wide-mouthed chicks; bigger ones feed baby Erotes (Loves), and when fully grown they immediately beget others in their turn."  

Other interesting facts about Greek mythology  

Greek civilization was the most influential civilization in the history of the world. They gave us democracy, mathematics, drama, philosophy, Olympics, and many gods and tomes of mythology adopted by many subsequent cultures.   

Athena, the god of architecture, is supposed to have a thousand eyes in the form of the leaves of the olive tree. She gifted the olive tree to the city of Athens and became its guardian goddess. The leaves of the olive tree are grey at the back, and when the wind blows and lifts the leaves, it looks like a thousand eyes are watching over the city.  

Pandora, created by Zeus, the god of lightning and the king of all gods, was the first mortal woman according to Greek mythology. She received a gift from each of the Gods to make her perfect. Zeus gave her to Epimetheus, who had been warned by his brother Prometheus not to take any tips from Zeus, but he got enchanted by Pandora's beauty and accepted. He gave her a box and told her never to open it. But she couldn't resist and opened it, letting out all evil and mistrust in the world.  

Atlas was a Titan who fought and led a battle of Titans against Zeus but got defeated and was punished by Zeus to hold up heavens on his shoulders for all eternity. For a while, he got Hercules to hold it up for him but then resumed his duties when Hercules cheated him into holding the heavens' weight again.  

Prometheus was another impressive Titan in Greek mythology. He was the wisest among the Titans and could see the future. He knew Zeus would win and fought from his side when he fought Cronus. He is notorious for thinking himself to be smarter than the Gods and kept stealing from them. When he stole fire from the Gods and gave it to the mortals, he was caught and punished by Zeus.